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babiesIn this charming book about having a new baby in the family, a new big sister, frustrated with the baby’s limitations, dreams of everything she’ll do with her baby when she’s big enough. She plans to teach the baby important things like how to walk, how to look both ways at the corner, and how to lick up ice cream drips. She imagines singing songs with the baby. Getting carried away she asks, “Baby, do you want me to teach you a song?” The following double-page spread makes the baby’s displeasure abundantly clear: strips of brightly colored paper shoot violently over the page. On one side is a small drawing of the baby with a wide-open mouth, dwarfed by the volume of her screams. The illustrations are done in collage, ink, and oil pastels with riotous color and texture on every page. This book is perfect for a preschool storytime on siblings or new babies. There are many great books on these themes; two are Katy Duck: Big Sister and Yum Yum, Baby Bundt. The author, Nancy Patz, is also an artist. Her paintings have been shown at the Baltimore Museum of Art, among other places. Illustrator Susan L. Roth has illustrated many books of Native American folk tales.

Check the WRL catalog for Babies Can’t Eat Kimchee.

slugsMarylou is a lovesick slug. Love poems for Herbie, the object of her affection, fill her mind day and night. Although she’s too shy to talk to him in person, she begins writing her poems in slime where Herbie will be sure to see them. Herbie, intrigued, responds in kind, but his poems keep vanishing before Marylou can find them. When they finally meet, their first words to each other are also in rhyme. The illustrations, done in marker and colored pencil and enhanced in Photoshop, add to the slugs’ vibrant personalities. Though they all look essentially the same (a source of confusion for Herbie, who doesn’t know what Marylou looks like), they can be identified by their jaunty headgear. Marylou wears bows around her eyestocks, Herbie wears a baseball cap, and various other slugs wear fedoras, kerchiefs, etc. This book is perfect for a Kindergarten storytime, and will be enjoyed especially by kids aged four to eight. Listeners will delight in the gross-out quality of the slimy slugs and laugh at the clever poetry. The author, Susan Pearson, grew up in part in Newport News. Illustrator Kevin O’Malley also illustrated the Miss Malarkey series. Readers who like Slugs in Love will also enjoy another funny book about leaving notes, Click Clack Moo: Cows that Type.

Check the WRL catalog for Slugs in Love.

TJ61-9-2013 JKT 175L CTP_Layout 1Cornelius, the Grudge Keeper, has a busy job. He receives complaints from all the town people – all their fights and squabbles, all their grudges and grumbles. He carefully files each one away in its proper place, so no one else in town has to keep a grudge.
But one day, a small breeze comes into town. This breeze grows and grows until finally it turns into a gale-force wind, which invades Cornelius’ house and sends the grudges about in a flurry. When the townspeople come to file their new grudges, they find their old ones all out of order! Suddenly, they wonder how important these grudges were in the first place.
But what will happen to Cornelius when no one has anything left to complain about?
This book is perfect for older children. There are plenty of big words that they may need to look up, so keep a dictionary close-by.

Check the WRL catalog for The Grudge Keeper.

dwMarc Brown’s Try it, You’ll Like It! is a book in the Arthur’s Family Values series.
Everyone is preparing for a summer luau, but D.W. does not want to try anything new. She won’t try new food, she won’t learn a new dance, she won’t even wear a new color! D.W. does not want to look silly.
The day of the luau comes, and everyone is having fun. D.W. isn’t even wearing a Hawaiian shirt, though. Soon she feels left out. Will she give in and try something new?
This is a great book that continues the adventures of Arthur and D.W. from the television series. It can teach children that they may miss out on fun if they are picky or afraid to try new things. At the end of the book D.W. has learned a lesson and she is now more adventurous than anyone else!

Check the WRL catalog for Try It, You’ll Like It!

catUsually, cats and mice do not get along at all. But in Boswell the Kitchen Cat, Boswell the cat has a special agreement with Lizzie the kitchen mouse and her children.
Boswell loves to cook fancy foods to eat and to share with friends. He makes a huge mess in the kitchen every time he cooks, but he hates to clean up afterward. Lizzie and her children always look for scraps, but there are none to be found. One day Boswell does not have time to clean before his guests arrive, so Lizzie and the other mice go to work.
Boswell is startled to see mice in his kitchen and is going to gobble them up, but wait! He notices a sparkling clean kitchen. Maybe Boswell and Lizzie can work out a deal?
This is a great book to teach children about cooking and about the responsibility of cleaning up.

Check the WRL catalog for Boswell the Kitchen Cat.

cloverThere Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Clover is a fun book for St. Patrick’s Day, or anytime. This rhyming book builds off of each thing the old lady swallows, and she keeps swallowing bigger and bigger things!
She begins by swallowing a clover, then a daisy to brighten the clover, and then a butterfly to rest on the daisy, and so on…. This old lady must have a very big stomach!
The old lady begins to dance with a leprechaun at the end of the book, and she giggles so much that everything she swallows comes back up, along with a St. Patrick’s Day surprise.
This is a great book to read aloud to children, and you can have fun guessing why the old lady swallows everything that she does, as well as what she swallows next. This is part of a series, and you should check all the other things this crazy old lady swallows!

Check the WRL catalog for There Was an Old Lady who Swallowed a Clover.

ninjaTiptoe… jump… crawl… chop! Ninja stealthily sneaks around the house looking for mischief. Ninja chops balloons, steals cookies, and kicks blocks – making his brother very upset! But when Ninja’s brother shows that he can be quiet and sneaky too, can the two of them play together?
At the end of the day there is not one ninja, but two! Ninja and his brother team up to form a running, jumping, karate-chopping team.
Ninja never tires of creeping around the house and then bursting into action, and your little ones will enjoy acting out Ninja’s moves themselves. Ninja, Ninja, Never Stop! is a fun book to read aloud to younger children and it can serve as a good lesson about being nice to siblings or friends.

Check the WRL catalog for Ninja, Ninja, Never Stop!

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