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mouse I’ve chosen to highlight another of Alison Murray’s books. You can see Murray’s instantly recognizable, simple illustrations in bright muted colors.
Little Mouse is the little girl in the story who is fighting against her timid image. She wants to be strong and fierce. She says, “I’m not timid like a little mouse. I’m very brave…and I can be scary too! Grrrrrrrr!” However when this little girl becomes timid, she is only too happy to be “Mommy’s Little Mouse…quiet and cosy, cuddly and dozy…”
This would be a wonderful, soothing, interactive bedtime story for the pre-school age group.
Check the WRL catalog for Little Mouse.

dogScottish author-illustrator, Alison Murray has written another first class picture book. It is based on the old nursery rhyme Hickory Dickory Dock. This latest book was first published in the U.S. in 2014. It has Murray’s bright characteristically vivid colors and illustrations. Rufus is the goofy dog in the story. Rufus follows his owner, Zack, to school one day! “Hickory, Dickory, Dock. A dog, a boy, a clock!  The day’s begun it’s time for fun!  Hickory, Dickory, Dock.” Unlike the lamb in the nursery rhyme Mary had a Little Lamb, Rufus is allowed to stay in school. Rufus joins in at band practice, dress up time and painting time.  “The clock strikes eleven.  It’s make-a-mess heaven.  Hickory, Dickory, Dock.” Rufus joins in for lunch at school and garden time and THEN he is taken home!     “Higglety, pigglety, pup     It’s time to clean you up!     The clock strikes five     Slip, slide, crash… dive!     Higglety, pigglety, pup.” Then it’s time for the end of the rhyme and the reader sees  Zack and Rufus fast asleep in bed. This is a great story for toddlers and pre-schoolers with simple, rhyming text.

Check the WRL catalog for Hickory Dickory Dog.

boatThis is another story by Jane Cabrera inspired by a favorite nursery rhyme – this time the rhythmic, story of Row, Row, Row Your Boat! I read it aloud and also sang it to a very large group of toddlers at Williamsburg Library. The children enjoyed the rhythm and the very bright illustrations of the different animals. Jane Cabrera involves the different animals in the interactive story.

Row, row, row your boat

Splish! and Splash! and Splatter!

If you see the monkeys swing,

Don’t forget to chatter-

and again:

Row, row, row your boat

through the narrow gap.

If you see a crocodile!

Don’t forget to Snap!        Snap! Snap!

This interactive and rhyming book has become a favorite book to share at story time especially for those times when you lose the toddlers’ attention.

Check the WRL catalog for Row, Row, Row Your Boat.

Go to Bed, MonsterIs your child afraid of monsters under the bed? This book could be a perfect (and fun!) antidote.

The simple story is about a child named Lucy who decides to draw a monster one night when she can’t sleep. She and the monster play and play, but when Lucy decides that it’s time for bed, the monster says, “No,” and proceeds to make every excuse that every child has ever used for staying up.

First, he’s hungry. So Lucy draws him a mountain of meatballs.  “Chomp, Chomp, Chomp!”  He eats them all.  When he wails that he is thirsty, she draws him a bucket of water, which he drinks with a, “Glub, glub.”   Lucy’s crayons get lots more work, as she draws him a bathroom, pajamas, a teddy bear and more.

Children enjoy guessing what Lucy will draw to satisfy her funny green friend. That makes it a fun interactive book for story time.   For a child who is afraid of monsters under the bed, I think this book could encourage that child to draw the monster, and then draw the things that “their” monster wants in order to fall asleep. A monster that needs a teddy bear isn’t so scary, after all!

The sparing text makes this book suitable for a child as young as three. But it is engaging enough for a kindergartener.  The illustrations are large enough to use with a group.

Check the WRL catalog for Go to Bed, Monster!

 

fortune CookiesEverybody loves biting off the crispy end of a fortune cookie to get to that little piece of paper inside. Will it say something exciting?

You get the same sort of fun without the calories with a read-aloud of Fortune Cookies.   The little girl in the story eats one fortune cookie a day for a week.  Inside each cookie illustration is a small tab that children can pull out to read that day’s fortune. The next day that fortune comes true!

This is one of my favorite interactive books to use with older children. Naturally, they love pulling out the fortunes and reading them.  But they also enjoy guessing how that fortune will turn out. There are only a few words on each page, and the illustrations by Raschka, a Caldecott Medal winner, are simple and wonderfully expressive.

As long as I’ve gotten approval beforehand, I like to follow this story with a special treat—a fortune cookie for everyone.

Check the WRL catalog for Fortune Cookies.

 

cookies weekBring on the mess! Kids love mischief-makers, and Cookie the cat is a master of destruction.

In this simple, toddler-friendly story, Cookie knocks plants off the windowsill, gets stuck in a kitchen drawer, upsets the trash can and even falls in the toilet.   Each disaster happens on a different day of the week, so the book can be used to teach the days of the week, although it’s too fun to save for just that purpose.

DePaola’s illustrations frequently only show bits of the rambunctious cat, such as one back foot and a tail poking out from under a wok.   This provides opportunities for discussion. I also like to encourage storytime kids to say, “Silly Cookie!” with each mishap, though that isn’t part of the text.

It is simple enough for tiny ones, but I would even use this with kindergarteners as a break between longer stories. I’ve used a big book version of this in story time, but because the illustrations are clear and simple, I think the smaller sized book would work with a group.

Check the WRL catalog for Cookie’s Week.

dollThe Ticky-Tacky Doll, by Cynthia Rylant, tells the story of a little girl and her best friend, Ticky-Tacky Doll.  They have been inseparable ever since the little girl’s grandmother created Ticky-Tacky but now, the little girl is starting school and her doll cannot come with her.

This book is great for any child who has a special stuffed friend.  It would also be good for any child starting Kindergarten.  This book would be ideal for children grades K-3.

If your child enjoyed this book he/she can also try William’s Doll by Charlotte Zolotow or Suki’s Kimono by Chieri Uegaki.

Check the WRL catalog for The Ticky-Tacky Doll.

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