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Archive for the ‘Humor’ Category

It’s one of those days when Frankie and Sal feel like they’ve done it all. The only solution, “Let’s do nothing!” And they certainly make an attempt, pretending to be motionless statues, trees, and skyscrapers. Unfortunately, Frankie’s imagination is too active to do nothing. As a statue he attracts pigeons, as a tree he attracts a dog with a full bladder, and as a skyscraper he attracts King Kong. Each attempt at doing nothing fails, but Sal is undeterred. What will they do if they can’t do “nothing”?

The visuals in this book are highly entertaining and will have readers laughing out loud. This one is a crowd-pleaser perfect for an older storytime audience.

Check the WRL catalog for Let’s Do Nothing!

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Interactive books are great for storytime. It’s even better when the book is both entertaining and educational. Let’s Count Goats will provide the necessary fun, as these anthropomorphized goats behave much like humans. This book will also give children a chance to practice their counting. And, as children love to point out, “It’s a rhyming book!”

“Here we see a show-off goat playing on the bars. But can we count the rowdy goats careering round in cars?”

Anything written by Mem Fox is a sure bet, and Jan Thomas’ pictures are perfect, as usual. The illustrations are cute, humorous, and flooded with color.

Check the WRL catalog for Let’s Count Goats!

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Sometimes you just need a book of practical advice. Such as, “If an elephant stands on your foot, keep calm. Panicking will only startle it.” Unfortunately, our hero lets out a shriek anyway, and now must run from a startled elephant. The book’s next piece of advice: “Running my attract tigers.” You see where this is going.

What to Do If an Elephant Stands on Your Foot is a cumulative story in which the actions of a young boy on safari put him in one perilous situation after another. He can’t seem to follow the book’s advice, so he finds himself being chased by everything from the titular elephant to a family of snakes.

Children will enjoy watching the young hero get into and out of some sticky spots with the help of the narrator (and some helpful monkeys). This humorous story is sure to entertain.

Check the WRL catalog for What to Do If an Elephant Stands on Your Foot.

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Go to Bed, MonsterIs your child afraid of monsters under the bed? This book could be a perfect (and fun!) antidote.

The simple story is about a child named Lucy who decides to draw a monster one night when she can’t sleep. She and the monster play and play, but when Lucy decides that it’s time for bed, the monster says, “No,” and proceeds to make every excuse that every child has ever used for staying up.

First, he’s hungry. So Lucy draws him a mountain of meatballs.  “Chomp, Chomp, Chomp!”  He eats them all.  When he wails that he is thirsty, she draws him a bucket of water, which he drinks with a, “Glub, glub.”   Lucy’s crayons get lots more work, as she draws him a bathroom, pajamas, a teddy bear and more.

Children enjoy guessing what Lucy will draw to satisfy her funny green friend. That makes it a fun interactive book for story time.   For a child who is afraid of monsters under the bed, I think this book could encourage that child to draw the monster, and then draw the things that “their” monster wants in order to fall asleep. A monster that needs a teddy bear isn’t so scary, after all!

The sparing text makes this book suitable for a child as young as three. But it is engaging enough for a kindergartener.  The illustrations are large enough to use with a group.

Check the WRL catalog for Go to Bed, Monster!

 

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cookies weekBring on the mess! Kids love mischief-makers, and Cookie the cat is a master of destruction.

In this simple, toddler-friendly story, Cookie knocks plants off the windowsill, gets stuck in a kitchen drawer, upsets the trash can and even falls in the toilet.   Each disaster happens on a different day of the week, so the book can be used to teach the days of the week, although it’s too fun to save for just that purpose.

DePaola’s illustrations frequently only show bits of the rambunctious cat, such as one back foot and a tail poking out from under a wok.   This provides opportunities for discussion. I also like to encourage storytime kids to say, “Silly Cookie!” with each mishap, though that isn’t part of the text.

It is simple enough for tiny ones, but I would even use this with kindergarteners as a break between longer stories. I’ve used a big book version of this in story time, but because the illustrations are clear and simple, I think the smaller sized book would work with a group.

Check the WRL catalog for Cookie’s Week.

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bathChildren never seem to tire of Mo Willems’ Pigeon books and neither do their parents. In The Pigeon Need a Bath! readers can expect the same humorous antics for which the Pigeon stories are so beloved.

The story begins with the reader being introduced to the Bus Driver character from Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus. He informs the reader that the Pigeon needs a bath and he could use some help. As usual, the Pigeon has his own strong opinions and he announces that he doesn’t really need a bath. The Pigeon gives various arguments as to why he doesn’t need a bath. His points start out calm and rational, but he is, after all, the Pigeon. He eventually loses it as his strong convictions rapidly deteriorate. One comical point in particular is when the Pigeon questions the readers own cleanliness and their right to judge him.

Mo Willems’ illustrations are fun and are always successful in depicting the range of emotions that make the Pigeon so comical in his zeal to prove a point. It’s hard not to laugh as he whips himself into frenzy.
Readers are certain to enjoy the conclusion and the Pigeon’s comedy of errors when he discovers the truth about bathing.

Check the WRL catalog for The Pigeon Needs a Bath!

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not normanNot Norman: a goldfish story is about a boy who wants a different kind of pet. He wants a pet that he can run and jump with…a furry pet. But not Norman!

But when he decides to trade Norman for a “good pet” he discovers that Norman is actually exactly what he’s looking for.

Author, Kelly Bennett, creates a straightforward story with simple language that begs this book to be read aloud. She brings Norman to life with language that shows the personality of this silly little goldfish and the relationship that forms between him and his owner. “Not Norman” is repeated over and over and gives young audiences a chance to “read along”. Noah K. Jones gives us lively artwork that enhances the story with his eye catching illustrations. This author/illustrator duo have given us a tale that is o-“fish”-ally one of my favorite story time gems for the summer.

Check the WRL catalog for Not Norman: a goldfish story.

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